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What do you do in Silicon Valley once you are over 40?

Seams that once you pass a certain stage the Valley might not be the right place to take the leap of faith. What are your thoughts?

16 Replies

Michael Leeds
4
0
Michael Leeds Entrepreneur • Advisor
CEO & Founder
Only you can let your age limit your options.

There's a quote, not sure who it's from, that goes something like... Overcome the notion that you must be regular. It robs you of the chance to be extraordinary.

Now just substitute an age for the word "regular".
Patrick Colmenar
0
3
Patrick Colmenar Entrepreneur
Development Manager at LDProducts
Act the part. Skinny jeans, well trimmed beard, thick rimmed glasses. Hair dye if necessary. Keep up to date on the news - Buzzfeed, Snapchat-DJ Khaled, Instagram.
Chris Sommerfield, MBA
4
0
Chris Sommerfield, MBA Entrepreneur
Director of Finance
Keep working. I am well over that and I do not see any roadblocks ahead!
David Austin
0
1
David Austin Entrepreneur
Entrepreneur
Move.
Craig Larson
0
0
Craig Larson Entrepreneur
Business Development • Analytics • Smarketing
Guy Kawasaki is over 40 ...
reconstitute your M O with the skills you've acquired
just don't drink as much Red Bull
Irwin Stein
0
0
Irwin Stein Advisor
Very experienced (40 years) corporate,securities and real estate attorney.
I find the question immature. I am a helluva lot smarter today than I was 10 or 20 years ago. The companies that I advise get the benefit of a lot of years of experience. I personally think that the smartest guys in the valley are thinking about how to sell to the group with the most money, baby boomers. Tech evolves and changes. Good business judgement matures.
Jason Gibb
6
0
Jason Gibb Entrepreneur
Real Estate, Director & Business Development, MBA, CMA
Youth being good for start-ups is a myth... The actual data tells a different story. More business are started by people over 40 than by people under 40, and they also have a much higher success rate. According to research by Vivek Wadhwa, an academic and tech entrepreneur, and the Kauffman Foundation, the average age of successful start-up founders in these and other high-growth industries was40. And high-growth start-ups are almost twice as likely to be launched by people over 55 as by people 20 to34.
Robert Lee
2
0
Robert Lee Advisor
Lifelong entrepreneur, inventor and artist
I come across this mentality in a lot of places and not just in the Valley. One of the things I sometimes point out when this discussion comes up is the simple fact that Colonel Sanders did not become a millionaire until he was 68! And Kentucky Fried Chicken is still around!

Not only that, I also like rubbing millennials' noses in the simple fact that Larry Paige and Sergey Brin are both in their 40's today and they were smart enough to bring in Eric Schmidt to provide adult supervision as CEO when they were starting out (Schmidt is now Chairman of the Board).

You will NOT gain experience by going to college and you certainly won't learn it out of a book. As a senior still inventing products and launching startups in my 60's, my battle scars are what set me apart from the younger entrepreneurs and allows me to provide insight as a mentor.

Don't know if it's just me but doesn't a lot of this negativity towards senior staffers sound just like how women in tech have also been treated over the years? I always thought that it's what is inside the brain that matters and not what's on the outside.
David C. MSE
0
0
David C. MSE Entrepreneur
CEO at Business Development

20 years from now there are going to be only children all across the world asking, "Mom..dad..why didn't I have a younger brother or sister." "Well your father loved to be trendy...he started wearing skinny jeans."


Act the part? I'm assuming this was a joke.


I agree with Steve, and would add it is an insecure question. Be who you are, own your age and experience.


Love the Colonial Sanders bit! He became an entrepreneur at 68. Then he ate his product and died the very next day! haa

Tanya Krackovic
0
0
Tanya Krackovic Advisor
Creating greater access and enabling meaningful user experience and engagement opportunities.
what makes you think that?
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