Big News: FounderDating is joining OneVest to build the largest community for entrepreneurs. Details here
Latest Notifications
You have no recent recommendations.
Name
Title
 
MiniBio
FOLLOW
Title
 Followers
FOLLOW TOPIC

Question goes here

1,300 Followers

  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur

Investing in early-stage startup in which one of two founders is committed only 75% of the time

What are the chances investors will invest in a seed-stage startup in which one of the two founders (not the CEO) is only available about 75% of the time? What if the only thing keeping the co-founder from full-time commitment is enrollment in a part-time MBA program? I realize there could be many viewpoints on this. Investors? Tried and tested entrepreneurs? What are your thoughts and experiences?

3 Replies

Leena Chitnis, MBA
1
0
Leena Chitnis, MBA Entrepreneur • Advisor
Content & Publication Manager at NetApp
In my experience, most investors only take a startup seriously once all principals (and they want more than one, and typically less than four) are 100% committed. A startup running on all cylinders means all people are extremely serious, have put serious skin in the game, and if they are kept very busy -- the startup's gotten good traction.

Partners not fully invested with their time shows a startup that isn't "hot" and/or bringing in those impressive numbers of eyeballs and early adopters/customers. If the startup was doing well, the guy in school would have to quit to give this burgeoning thing his full attention so it wouldn't fail.

More money is the goal of an MBA - of all degrees - and if he's still in school that means his startup isn't keeping him busy enough.
Adam Crabtree
0
0
Adam Crabtree Entrepreneur
Project Coordinator at Phonoscape
Many thanks for your response, Leena. Good to know.
Steve Nieker
0
0
Steve Nieker Advisor
I help first-time founders develop the skills and perspectives they need to grow with their companies.
Leena is 100% right. If you still want to pursue investment, a "friends and family" seed round is your option.
Join FounderDating to participate in the discussion
Nothing gets posted to LinkedIn and your information will not be shared.

Just a few more details please.

DO: Start a discussion, share a resource, or ask a question related to entrepreneurship.
DON'T: Post about prohibited topics such as recruiting, cofounder wanted, check out my product
or feedback on the FD site (you can send this to us directly info@founderdating.com).
See the Community Code of Conduct for more details.

Title

Give your question or discussion topic a great title, make it catchy and succinct.

Details

Make sure what you're about to say is specific and relevant - you'll get better responses.

Topics

Tag your discussion so you get more relevant responses.

Question goes here

1,300 Followers

  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
Know someone who should answer this question? Enter their email below
Stay current and follow these discussion topics?