Big News: FounderDating is joining OneVest to build the largest community for entrepreneurs. Details here
Latest Notifications
You have no recent recommendations.
Name
Title
 
MiniBio
FOLLOW
Title
 Followers
FOLLOW TOPIC

Question goes here

1,300 Followers

  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur

What are the best practices for managing startup employees?

This post was previously edited by a moderator.
I'm interested in tips, best practices, or resources (books, articles, etc.) that they've found helpful in effectively managing employees in an early stage startup?

27 Replies

Helen Adeosun
1
0
Helen Adeosun Entrepreneur
Co-Founder and CEO of CareAcademy.co
I liked parts "Managing to Change the World" from the Management Center which helps progressive orgs manage staff and create systems. I dont think anything holds all the rules, including this book, but read, read, and find your center. Let me know if you find anything good.
Thomas Knoll
6
0
Thomas Knoll Entrepreneur • Advisor
Executive Advisor & Business Coach. I help entrepreneurs survive and thrive at building their teams and businesses.
If all team members in a small early-stage company don't feel a sense of ownership, you're fighting a losing battle. So, make everyone the CEO of something, and let them actually be 98% in charge of final decisions in the area they are CEO of. If you don't trust them to do that, then fire them now, and replace them with someone you would trust.

Most management resources are written for very large companies who actually have multiple tiers of management. Starts aren't run the same way as big companies, so be careful with any of the information you learn from those sources.

Now that I've said that,http://www.fastcompany.com/section/30-second-mba is actually a good source of ideas. Just don't treat the advice as a recipe, but more like a list of ingredients.
Peter Sankauskas
1
0
Peter Sankauskas Entrepreneur • Advisor
Founder & CEO at CloudNative
Actually, there is a free book on the Kindle called "The truth about managing people". Short, but good.
Vijay Goel, MD
2
0
Vijay Goel, MD Entrepreneur • Advisor
Founder Chefalytics, Co-owner Bite Catering Couture, Independent consultant (ex-McKinsey)
I really like Andy Grove's book - High Output Management. Focus on leverage, decision-making, and understanding of performance. Ben's blog (Andreeson Horowitz) and Murk Suster's blog are also both very good.
Joe Mellin
2
0
Joe Mellin Entrepreneur
View My Learnings
Be very honest.

Let them have autonomy to make decisions.

If you can't do that. Don't hire them.

When you start to debate if you should fire someone, do it that day.
Steve Tulk
1
0
Steve Tulk Entrepreneur
Change Agent
I would look at some leadership focused materials vs management. Big difference in my opinion. I am a big John Maxwell fan, and the 5 Levels of Leadership would be a good one to pick up. Agree with the other comments on here. My view, an early stage startup needs self starters who can work with agility.
Thomas Knoll
1
0
Thomas Knoll Entrepreneur • Advisor
Executive Advisor & Business Coach. I help entrepreneurs survive and thrive at building their teams and businesses.
Ohhh! Which reminds me, Emotional Intelligence 2.0 was absolutely the best book to help me change myself to become better at management:http://www.amazon.com/Emotional-Intelligence-2-0-Travis-Bradberry/dp/[removed to protect privacy]
Vijay Goel, MD
1
0
Vijay Goel, MD Entrepreneur • Advisor
Founder Chefalytics, Co-owner Bite Catering Couture, Independent consultant (ex-McKinsey)
I've found this to potentially be problemmatic - I liked how my first couple of managers treated me, which is to give me just enough leash to hang myself but enough feedback/ support up front to keep me from doing so on accident. I've found the learning curve of coming into a new organization is often made better by allowing someone to prove that they "got it" in the current schema before giving them the autonomy to make decisions about how to change or run it Otherwise, existing processes can be overturned by the overeager newcomer, which is not a good way to get started in a new role when you don't really know the business.
David Hunter
0
0
David Hunter Entrepreneur
Machine Learning Research, University of Oxford
This is a great little book that will take you literally 1 hour to read:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/One-Minute-Manager-Productivity-Prosperity/dp/[removed to protect privacy]/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=[removed to protect privacy]&sr=1-1&keywords=one+minute+manager.
Guy Lubovitch
0
0
Guy Lubovitch Entrepreneur
Manager Solutions Architect, Americas
I like this book, i guess there are more updated ones but this talk a lot of about aspects of starting a software company. maybe more in the technical aspects

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/[removed to protect privacy]/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Guy
Join FounderDating to participate in the discussion
Nothing gets posted to LinkedIn and your information will not be shared.

Just a few more details please.

DO: Start a discussion, share a resource, or ask a question related to entrepreneurship.
DON'T: Post about prohibited topics such as recruiting, cofounder wanted, check out my product
or feedback on the FD site (you can send this to us directly info@founderdating.com).
See the Community Code of Conduct for more details.

Title

Give your question or discussion topic a great title, make it catchy and succinct.

Details

Make sure what you're about to say is specific and relevant - you'll get better responses.

Topics

Tag your discussion so you get more relevant responses.

Question goes here

1,300 Followers

  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
Know someone who should answer this question? Enter their email below
Stay current and follow these discussion topics?