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Should you pitch investors with a deck?

There's a trend lately to pitch investors without a deck. I fully believe you should have a deck in your back pocket, but I've had better luck having a conversation to start and sending the deck after. it's more natural and has yielded better results. From others experience, should founders pitch with or without a Deck? What have others found most success with?

16 Replies

Sutha Kamal
4
0
Sutha Kamal Entrepreneur
Investor - VP Technology Strategy
Use a deck. The best way to tell a story is to *deliberately* craft and tell that story. There's a reason that Jobs' keynotes were so carefully designed, choreographed and rehearsed. If a deck makes you really uncomfortable, that's fine, but remember that a VC is generally trying to answer a bunch of big questions about the market, product, team, etc. in a short amount of time. A well designed and rehearsed pitch should be able to cover a lot of these quickly, giving you more time to have that free-flowing, natural conversation you mention.
Andrew Lockley
0
0
Andrew Lockley Advisor
Investor and strategy consultant
Depends entirely on context. If it's a literal elevator pitch, or during a dinner, then no. If it's a formal meeting or presentation, then usually. But your deck is probably rubbish and a good investor is probably quicker than the deck if you just let him ask the questions (should he want to). A
Linda Plano
1
0
Linda Plano Advisor
Life's a pitch. Make yours amazing!
My guess is that this trend comes from investors who are sick and tired of looking at pitch decks, especially poorly done pitch decks.

As a pitch coach, my experience is that the first thing investors ask for before offering to have a formal meeting is to see your pitch deck. It's a reality check for them and a marketing doc to interest their partners in coming to your pitch.

Even if you didn't need to send a deck ahead, I think it's a very bad idea to present *anything* without visuals. People take in information and learn in different ways: some do better when they can read, others when seeing visuals, and others by listening. Usually, it's a mix of all 3 but, for instance, if you pitched to me, a very visual learner, just by talking, chances are that I'd miss important information.

Assuming, as Andrew Lockley said, that you are doing more than an informal elevator pitch, you need a deck. You never know how people learn when you are first pitching to them, so having no deck, i.e., no visuals nor writing, is a risky move, IMO.

You are also making your life more difficult in the long run: If you are going to pitch without visuals, then you have to have memorized your pitch - which is always a good idea. If you don't, the chances of your forgetting important ideas is very high. Heck, that happens all the time even with well-prepared decks!

Finally, when I am retained to develop a pitch (visuals and script), I invariably find that creating the visuals forces me to be more accurate in telling the story than when I just write a script.
Peter Johnston
5
0
Peter Johnston Advisor
Businesses are composed of pixels, bytes & atoms. All 3 change constantly. I make that change +ve.
They always say about a committee meeting that you should know the result of the vote before you walk in the room.

The same applies with pitch decks.Walking into a room full of strangers, hoping your pitch deck will win the day is just naive.

Do your research. Find out the bio of everyone in the room. What interests them, what they have invested in previously and how well it went, where they were educated, even whether they have a partner and children.

Put these bios together. Work out common themes - what will get general enthusiasm, what will only get one or two. And look for the likely power dynamic - who will defer to whom, who will take opposite positions etc.

Ideally you should have some insiders... people who are on your side and can turn negative conversations to your advantage. People who can explain key points and build on your ideas (it works better when they do it than you do).

This takes a lot of work. But then, you aren't simply making a single sale - these are going to be your partners if you are accepted.

One of the hangovers of the industrial age is the idea that sales is purely a numbers game. That neither party can or does do research beforehand. And that you can afford to pitch and accept a failure rate of 1 in 10 or whatever.

The Pitch is the end game - the "are we all on the same page and agreed about what we are going to do together" moment. The trying out, seeing if there is a fit etc. happens long before.
Jeffrey Weitzman
1
0
Jeffrey Weitzman Entrepreneur
Consultant at Space-Time Insight
In my experience, you need a pitch deck. You need to create it to hone your pitch, as others have advised, and you will often be asked to send it in advance of a meeting. There are tons of resources online about what makes a good pitch deck, and some contradictory advice. I think the most important thing is that it be concise, cover the most critical information for your stage (e.g. for a seed investment, the go-to-market slide is going to be key), and look good.

I think that last bit is often overlooked. You will see examples of some very big companies that had pretty awful early pitch decks. But you won't see the thousands that failed. So spend time, energy, and yes, some money, on a really great deck. Good design can have an impact, and you should agonize over the wording on every slide. Always try to use fewer words if you can. Don't create slides that you will read. Create slides that complement what you intend to say. Make sure you have articulated the problem/solution or value proposition so clearly that you could stop right there. If the investors believe you at that point, then the only thing left to figure out is whether you are the right people to solve that problem. If they don't buy the premise, the rest of the deck won't change anything.

Finally, having a great deck doesn't mean you have to use it every time. Have it ready, but if you can dive into a discussion with a potential investor, even better. You should know your pitch cold and be able to give it without any visuals. If the conversation goes well, the investor buys your problem/solution proposition, and things are clicking, then feel free to pull up a slide with details that you want to get into. It's all about connection and energy.
Alexander Laszlo Ross
1
0
Alexander Laszlo Ross Entrepreneur • Advisor
Head of Business Development at Verifide
Short version... use the pitch deck to guide the conversation to the story you want to tell. Don't be a slave to the deck, of course, but it helps focus the overall conversation.
Benedikt von Schröder
0
0
Digital Health and Life Science Investor/Mentor
Having no deck makes the discussion more natural, yes! But it requires that you have your pitch really down. Otherwise you are at risk getting off track. You should never start a pitch meeting by immediately whipping out your deck. Start with an exec summary, the one minute elevator pitch, then use your deck to get into detail. Check in with your audience if there are specific questions or areas of concern. Use the deck to support a focussed discussion. Once your audience understands the key elements of your business, which you should have achieved with the one minute exec summary, it is ok to navigate through your deck based where the discussion leads you.
David Beatty
0
0
David Beatty Advisor
Entrepreneur
Do whatever you need to do to achieve your objective for the pitch, (which is most often to get the next meeting). Thats all that really matters. And if the investor/investors have a hard rule on what you have to do, they are probably not the people you want as investor partners in your company.
Wayne Barz
0
0
Wayne Barz Entrepreneur
Manager, Entrepreneurial Services
My first reaction is..."why are you asking us?" If you've been invited to pitch, I'd ask your host if they have a preference. Investors each have their own styles, so know what they want. Always, always, always have a short (10 slide?) deck ready to serve as a discussion guide and have lots of backup slides available in case the conversation gets deep.
Kristi Colvin
0
0
Kristi Colvin Entrepreneur
Principal at Fresh ID
I'm glad the question was asked. There are some great tips here on pitch decks. And like Wayne mentions, one of the things we do for clients when we design pitch decks (and they are highly designed.. style sells) is we follow the general rule of less is more for the initial pitch, but at the end of the deck we include detailed/advanced information that investors may want if interested. This way our client has accurate and ready data there without having to think about those details by memory (sometimes hard when nervous) but they can give the short and succinct version without getting into them if the investors are not into the idea. We try to keep the slides sort of "single-focus" - there is not a lot of info on one slide, but what is there looks good. We also advise them on what to wear - you ARE a part of the presentation... think of yourself and the deck as a full package.
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