Big News: FounderDating is joining OneVest to build the largest community for entrepreneurs. Details here
Latest Notifications
You have no recent recommendations.
Name
Title
 
MiniBio
FOLLOW
Title
 Followers
FOLLOW TOPIC

Question goes here

1,300 Followers

  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur
  • Name
    Entrepreneur

What coding classes or courses are meant for business people?

I'm interested in understanding what resources and courses exist and are helpful for business people to learn about coding, product development, etc.

21 Replies

Cynthia Schames
2
0
Cynthia Schames Entrepreneur
Founder & CEO, AbbeyPost
Well, Codecademy (who just announced that they are moving to NYC full time--woohoo!) is a pretty awesome resource. http://www.codecademy.com/#!/exercises/0
Ben Sykes
1
0
Ben Sykes Entrepreneur • Advisor
Design Director + Experience Strategist - Since '95
Check outhttp://www.learnstreet.com. They are based in Palo Alto and have some serious backers. I'm in discussions currently to improve the experience.
David Bergman
5
2
David Bergman Entrepreneur
CTO, Co-Founder of Stackray, Inc.
Maybe it is just my being overly stupid, but it took me some solid 3,000 hours just to get a firm understanding of coding, and around 12,000 hours to master it.

What I would rather do is the meta study of the object: to understand what the development process means, rather than trying to understand coding per se.

There is a stance in the "business world" that coding is just taking some ideas - concocted by business folks - and simply linearize them into a format suitable for computers. The term "coding" does not help in ridding this misconception.

To put it another way: software development is a very challenging combination of art, science and engineering (if done right...) so trying to take a course in it is as fruitful as taking a nightly course at advanced neurosurgery without any a priori knowledge about anatomy or biology or thinking that learning to apply band aid could somehow yield a deep understanding in heart transplantation processes.

Rant done, so just take a "technical project management" course or read some such books.
Zach Lupei
2
0
Zach Lupei Entrepreneur
I tried a few different sites (includingcodeacademy and phpacademy) and found Lynda.comto be the best. It's not interactive like codeacademy, but the depth and breadth of content is remarkable. They have courses ranging from LAMP stack to amazon web services to product development.
Michael Brill
3
0
Michael Brill Entrepreneur
Technology startup exec focused on AI-driven products
Ha... I was just wrote an inelegant version of David's post. Look, there's nothing wrong with dabbling and learning a bit about programming... but if you really want to contribute in a meaningful way, you have to learn a ton about lots of different technologies - not something you'll pick up in a few days on CodeAcademy.

What engineers need is good product managers... people who can understand a market opportunity, work with customers, and work with the development team on an MVP and roadmap. It definitely does help to understand development in this process, but it's more about concepts rather than syntax.


Vijay Goel, MD
1
0
Vijay Goel, MD Entrepreneur • Advisor
Founder Chefalytics, Co-owner Bite Catering Couture, Independent consultant (ex-McKinsey)
Best place to start is probably the Steve Blank/ Eric Reis stuff: . 4 steps to the epiphany (product), . Lean Startup. If you want to code, opinions will vary on language. I'm learning Rails. Really enjoyed: . Michael Hartl's rails tutorial . Codeschool's Rails for Zombies . Railscasts
Michael Brill
0
0
Michael Brill Entrepreneur
Technology startup exec focused on AI-driven products
+1 on Blank/Reis books.
Matt Monday
2
0
Matt Monday Entrepreneur
Partner at STRV
http://teamtreehouse.com is solid. If you have some money to spend, can't go wrong withhttps://generalassemb.ly

Blake West
4
0
Blake West Entrepreneur • Advisor
Software Engineer at Hint Health
David's point about coding being an art is spot on. Definitely takes thousands and thousands of hours to master.

However, I will disagree with the point that taking a software development course is fruitless. On the contrary, my experience taking just a few courses (Udacity, Coursera), reading a book on HTML/CSS, and actually doing some VERY minor real work (like creating our splash site www.lessonup.co) has taught me an immense amount about what it means to code and about the architecture of the web, computers, etc. It's given me a visceral appreciation for the mental discipline (and kinds of environments) that are needed to do good dev work, which lets me interact with and "get" the devs on my team better.

Perhaps most importantly, it's given me the vocabulary and knowledge of modern technologies to intelligently talk to developers, and to understand what kindof developers and technologies I need for my project. Which in turn, gives me more respect from the devs I might try to hire.

So my thought is don't take a course because you think you'll be able to do it yourself after just 1 class. You won't (see Dave's point above). BUT it's extremely important for any "business" person in technology to at least know and actually dosome coding so that you aren't completely blind.

--> and to your actual question: Udacity's CS101 is a great head-first dive into coding for complete beginners. Then their Web Development course afterwards is an excellent followup for getting your hands dirty and understanding web architecture.

David Bergman
1
1
David Bergman Entrepreneur
CTO, Co-Founder of Stackray, Inc.
I agree with Blake West that there could be *some* merit get a brief insight into coding, but *not* to actually solve problems oneself or even understand how they are solved, but merely to come to the conclusion I brought up earlier: that software development is a challenging humanendeavor. Or, at least that GOOD software development is...

Additionally, software coding is FUN, so it is always worth knowing a little bit about it, if nothing else for pure pleasure/hobby, but do NOT conflate those simple Ruby scripts converting Fahrenheit to Celsius with solving a reasonable challenging conceptual and technical problem in the mobile service space, for instance.
Join FounderDating to participate in the discussion
Nothing gets posted to LinkedIn and your information will not be shared.

Just a few more details please.

DO: Start a discussion, share a resource, or ask a question related to entrepreneurship.
DON'T: Post about prohibited topics such as recruiting, cofounder wanted, check out my product
or feedback on the FD site (you can send this to us directly info@founderdating.com).
See the Community Code of Conduct for more details.

Title

Give your question or discussion topic a great title, make it catchy and succinct.

Details

Make sure what you're about to say is specific and relevant - you'll get better responses.

Topics

Tag your discussion so you get more relevant responses.

Question goes here

1,300 Followers

  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
  • Name
    Details
Know someone who should answer this question? Enter their email below
Stay current and follow these discussion topics?