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Relocate Business to United states

I am currently located in Karachi. Pakistan and planning to relocate my Business in United States, but before relocating my business i am wondering to Join a Company as employee so that i can have the knowledge of how is the Market and other things work in United States,, so what do you all members suggest What shall i do,? Is it good Idea to Join and Work with?

15 Replies

Alex Eckelberry
2
0
Alex Eckelberry Advisor
CEO at Meros.io
Well, if you can get a visa... get in however way you can. Sure, it's a good idea to start off working for another company to learn the ropes. But you can also learn the ropes with your own company.

However, I would recommend working on your basic English grammar and spelling skills though. While Americans are generally forgiving, it is an area where we can be somewhat judgemental, and your writing wouldn't pass well in the US right now. Or, at least have a fluent speaker proofread what you post.

Good luck!
Dolmarie Mendez, MBA, CHRS, SICS
0
0
Vice President, Corporate Benefits at Olympic Agency and Executive Vice President-Partner, Abartys Health
Consider Tax inventives for Business relocation. There is great opportunities for investors in PR, is not a state, but US territory too. Look information for Act 20 and 22.
Steve Everhard
0
0
Steve Everhard Advisor
All Things Startup
Murtaza you might be able to enter the Green Card lottery, otherwise you'll need a sponsor to get a work visa. Your sponsor would normally be your employer and would have to show that you have specific skills not available in the general workforce. You really can't just rock up and get a job and a lot of smaller employers will be daunted by the process. Larger companies are pretty skilled at navigating the rules but you'll have to have the job offer and work visa before you arrive - you can't come in as a tourist and transition to a work visa.

Starting a company gives you no automatic right to reside in the U.S. Either. As a foreign owner you only have the choice of a C corp as a vehicle for business and your company will then be liable for Federal and State taxes even though you have no right to reside until your business employs a minimum number of local employees.


Murtaza Mukarram
0
0
Murtaza Mukarram Entrepreneur
Looking for a opportunity
Thanks #Alex Eckelberry, #Dolmarie Mendez,#Steve Everhardfor your response.

#Alex: I am working on my English Language, I know my English grammar and spelling speak is week/Worst.

#Steve:Getting a work visa sounds good but I think approaching to big companies is a bit hard Job, I would need a Consultant for that who could introduce me to them or find a company. Do you know any company/entrepreneur who would be helpful in getting me work visa?,

Getting a lottery visa is not for Pakistan anymore, I don't know why?
Steve Everhard
0
0
Steve Everhard Advisor
All Things Startup
Murtaza I'm not an immigration lawyer, this is just my own research. Linked-In is a good source of large company recruitment and there are specialist recruiters everywhere here that you could research online. I don't know your skill set so I can't really direct you. I don't think you need a consultant but you do need to be able to pitch your skills as unique. You are in heavy competition and a company would need good reason to take on the cost and complexity of bringing you into the country.

The lottery moves from country to country based on a number of factors. Explanation is never given.
Dirk de Kok
0
0
Dirk de Kok Advisor
Founder and CTO Mobtest
H1B last year was oversubscribed by 2/3: 240,000 instead of the 85,000 visas available. It is hard. If you really want to do it, first visit. Network, get to know people. And then apply. But its hard, you need to be really good and your english should at least be decent. It is expensive for the company (think 15-20k in legal fees), so make sure they like you a lot.


H1B submissions start in April, and then your company has only 1 week to apply for the whole year. So get here before Christmas, and apply before NYE. Otherwise lawyers will not have enough time.

good luck
Petr Palan
0
0
Petr Palan Entrepreneur
CEO at hDock42 Ltd. - expertise and funds for ideas from R&D to global commercial success
Muratza, I'd suggest if you can, just get any visa and go and explore, make connections and soon, opportunity will present itself. Especially, if you have any good technical base knowledge, there're tons of opportunities.
Also I'd explore if there's a possibility to get help or support from US MAC (US Market Access) as they like to support young entrepreneurs relocating to US.
You may need to run with different visa for a while but it's all about getting there and starting. It still works the best.
Good luck on the journey!
Benjamin Olding
0
1
Benjamin Olding Advisor
Co-founder, Board Member at Jana
@Dirk - I would not be so intimidated by the H1-B process (nor spread facts like this if you don't have first hand experience). This is a little off-topic for this thread, but I hate seeing entrepreneurs dismissing H1-Bs as a way to build their team, even early on. In my experience, at least, the legal fees should be $4000 (pretty much on the nose - this is just paperwork; it's very predictable how much time it's going to take them).

You are correct about needing to apply before April. While you are also correct that the number of H1-B applications greatly exceeds the number of allowed slots, it is definitely not a lottery and you should not view it that way: you're submitting an argument for why you should be able to employ a specific non-US citizen to do work for your company. The total number of applications is not as relevant as you might expect to this process. I have 100% success rate; you have to take the application seriously, but it really should not be that difficult to get it approved, at least if you are a legitimate tech startup.

Part of the reason the number of applications are so high is there are several large companies who basically try to skirt the rules by using H1-Bs to outsource labor. They dominate the number of applications, and they also dominate the number of rejections.

Your figure of $15k-20k is correct for a green card, which is maybe what you are thinking of, but if you are ever talking to lawyers who want to charge this much for an H1-B, you are basically talking to people without much experience.

@Murtaza - if you have the resources, you might consider coming to the US on a student visa for a Master's degree. Schools can help introduce you to employers and you'll have an opportunity to figure out the US market culturally while you study as well. If you do something like this, though, I would recommend you stick strictly to the major cities in the US. There are lots of great educational institutions in the US located in out of the way places, but it kind of undercuts the main point of considering this route - the point is to come and build relationships.
Rochelle Kopp
0
0
Rochelle Kopp Advisor
Japanese business culture expert and cross-cultural communications specialist
Following up on what Alex said, you may be interested in the Writing Coach service which is specifically designed for helping non-native speakers of English polish their written communication for professional purposes.http://japanintercultural.com/en/writingCoach/default.aspx
Dirk de Kok
0
0
Dirk de Kok Advisor
Founder and CTO Mobtest
@benjamin that 15k-20k figure was something I know a friend of mine paid. Googling I realize that was a lot, and it seems with $1,575 in filing fees base to $3,550 (company > 25 empl + premium processing) plus attorney costs of $2k-$4k- should do.

That said, the last 2 years there has definitely been a lottery, and this lottery takes place _before_ processing the petition (only duplicates are taken out). So my math holds (a little more details re applications for people with masters' degres or individuals from Chile or Singapore)http://www.uscis.gov/news/alerts/uscis-completes-h-1b-cap-random-selection-process-fy-2016

On top of that, filing in April and getting the visa means you can only start working by October. This makes the H1B visa not a great fit for fast moving startups.
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