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How long can you stay on Wordpress?

Wordpress is great for building prototypes. I have a working prototype built on WP, I am wondering how much more to invest in it, and how much I can stretch the system. Obviously I can't build another system until some funding is secured, but I wonder about how much more money I should pour into the prototype site (which is currently live)

27 Replies

ian johnstone
1
0
ian johnstone Advisor
Startup founder/advisor/consultant. Passionate about Tech for Good.
Depends on what you're building, but you can get pretty far. A lot of really big companies are using it:http://en.wordpress.com/notable-users/
Alan Peters
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0
Alan Peters Entrepreneur
VP Product and Technology at BusinessBlocks
Depends on your functionality. Pm me if you want a technical sounding board
Ben Rosenthal
0
0
Ben Rosenthal Entrepreneur
Mac + Sustainability Coach | Communication Strategist
I guess it depends on what you're trying to build, Christina. Big sites like The New York Times and Huffington Post are built on Wordpress.
Manny Acevedo
2
0
Manny Acevedo Entrepreneur
Business Systems Analyst & Entrepreneur
For your mommy timeshare, I personally would not build too much on WP other than using it as a CMS/blog. While you could develop the matchmaking functionality within WP, why would you? You can do a lot with WP, but it's easier to develop these outside of WP and avoid all of the extra overhead. Especially if you have an intention of moving off of it.
Anthony Zeoli
1
0
Anthony Zeoli Entrepreneur • Advisor
Digital Strategy and WordPress Consultant and Trainer
It really depends on what you're goals are and what you want your site to do. You can build in WordPress. We build sophisticated websites on it all the time. You just need someone who understands what WordPress is capable of and most people who don't work on WordPress at a high level like I do understand what WordPress is capable of. You need to let me know what your specifications and requirements are for the future interations and what your business does and I can then let you know what WordPress is capable of and how you can build out in the platform. If you don't flow the platform advancements then you simply can't know if it's the right tool for the job. Is be happy to chat offline with you about it. Best regards, Tony Zeoli President Digital Strategy Works I do this stuff: Digital Strategy WordPress - sent from my iPhone
Christina Tseng
0
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Christina Tseng Advisor
Product Marketing, Management Consultant
Thanks so much! I figured out why this question was important to me - I am probably 25% of a programmer, 10% even, and I have been spending a lot of time trying to understand WP to do a little bit of customization myself. The thing is, if I am not going to be on this platform for long, I should just spend money have whatever developer patch things in for me for now since it's just a prototype.

I have always felt the technical understanding is important to me as a product manager, but I think I will spend more energy on other aspects of the business (there are many) instead of trying to learn about the actions and filters myself.

Will definitely ping you guys offline. Thanks again!!! BTW - I am looking for a technical co-founder, any interest?
Ben Sharir
0
0
Ben Sharir Entrepreneur
Sr. eCommerce Consultant
Why do you even think replacing Wordpress? You can scale with wordpress, big sites use it. -Ben
Anthony Zeoli
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Anthony Zeoli Entrepreneur • Advisor
Digital Strategy and WordPress Consultant and Trainer
Christina,

What's important to know is, what are you building? Are you building an e-commerce site? Are you building a publishing engine? What's does your business do? It's impossible to give you advice without knowing what you're trying to do.

As a Product Manager myself and not a developer, but a person that can read code and understand generally what's going on, I understand what you've got yourself into, since you said yourself you're only 25% developer. If I were you, I would push through and really get to the point where you can make this happen yourself. There are many WordCamps you can go to around the country or local WordPress Meetups, where you will find others who can help answer your development questions. Just go to Meetup.com to find them.

Also, you can jump on the WordPress developers IRC channel and ask questions there, or find some WordPress devs on Twitter - there are many on there, who can answer questions that you have.

We built Neighborbee.com on WordPress. You can see it's a complete social network with advanced Google Maps API integration based on user zip codes. It's not a small blog, by any stretch of the imagination.

For anyone to say that you should only build a small blog on WordPress, they would be wrong. You can build an ecommerce site, a jobs board, a full on website with multiple sections and custom navigation inside of each section, as well as custom post types, taxonomies and formats. There is a lot you can do with WordPress, you just need to know how.

As for me, I'm engaged in so many projects, I can't take you up on your offer of tech co-founder. Have too much on my plate now. Go to a WordCamp or a WordPress Meetup in your area. You'll find the answers to a lof of your questions.

If you can share what your business model is, that would be helpful to give you advice on the right path.
Tony Dobaj
0
0
Tony Dobaj Entrepreneur • Advisor
CTO at Bizzz
Christina, as a technical project manager I'm walking in your shoes and this is what I've observed over the course of our prototyping effort.
  • While wp is immeasurably more powerful than coding HTML, getting beyond rudimentary level functionality in a manner that is architecturally scalable takes an SME (subject matter expert). Sure you can build enterprise-grade sites with wp, but those organization have armies of SME's to throw at the effort.
  • Anthony et al are right, you need to spend some time with an SME to critically hash out scope and complexity to make the right decision - you most certainly do not want to hit a brick wall 6 months down the road.
  • You don't need to go to a consulting firm that charges $350 per hour to gain this insight, we've found a couple of college-going-wiz-kids that are SME's at a fraction of the price. Heck, maybe you'll get lucky and find the next Zuckerberg and pay him or her in pizza and beer. I suspect you'll have to fish elsewhere to find such individuals.
  • Our business model relies on the timely analysis of ginormous, complex, and dynamic data sets, something that wp (natively) doesn't do very well. In the interest of time, we've accepted this limitation and have carefully planned the transition. Some might argue this point, but we've got a better idea that gives us a competitive advantage :-)
Good luck!
Jamil Ben Alluch Ben Amar - ing. jr, GCIH
0
0
Jr. Computer Engineer, Computer and Network Security Specialist
My advice is to try to stay away as much as possible from WP or any PHP application for that matter.

While WP is a very feature complete platform for CMS (very popular, lots of support and lots of plugins), it relies on PHP as it's functional language; over the course of the last couple of years PHP has been plagues with an increasing number of bugs and as such security holes that make website vulnerable to hackers, more so with Wordpress as it is one of the most popular CMS on the net.
From a security standpoint, it's quite a nightmare (https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvekey.cgi?keyword=wordpress)

I would advise to try looking into Ruby on Rails (RefineryCMS, Locomotive CMS) or Python Django CMSs (Django CMS, Mezzanine); these are very customizable and offer much more flexibility in terms of what you can do visually or functionality you can add.

The drawback is that they do require a bit of programming and getting to learn the language enough to be able to perform more advanced tasks; that being said, they usually work out of the box, and just need to be customized with CSS and HTML.

Hope this helps.
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