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Thoughts on video presentations?

I'd love some feedback on what FD people think is more effective when it comes to video presentations for explaining what you do, how it works and the benefits/value.

Basically what works better - a Founder or the team discussing their product on camera v a product walk through (animation, screen shots, headlines etc.)

Thanks!

11 Replies

Paul Bostwick
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Paul Bostwick Entrepreneur
Researcher and Self-Employed Product Designer
I find most talking heads presentations go too slowly and are subject to distracting visual and social noise Might be good if there is some special credibility that comes from the star power of the talkers or some special context. But for the most part I find animated explainers to be the big winners in this domain. Less ego intrusion in general and getting a good visual (third party) thinker involved in clarifying your message seems to be the primary benefit of going that way. -Paul =================== =================== Paul Bostwick [removed to protect privacy] land [removed to protect privacy] mobile [removed to protect privacy] skype paulbostwickoakland Developer of PV-Thermal Solar Collectors Hot Hybrids = 3x the power solarspork.blogspot.com white papers: State of the market for Hybrids (some context) Hot Hybrids (what I am working on) "Future comes by itself, progress does not" -Poul Henningsen =================== ===================
Anthony Zeoli
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Anthony Zeoli Entrepreneur • Advisor
Digital Strategy and WordPress Consultant and Trainer
A founder walking through their product can be viewed as having a strong command of the product. However, generally speaking things can go wrong in a product demonstration. CEOs or other executives can look weak when they don't mean to be. They can get distracted by someone off stage. I recall recently someone walking offstage when they got flustered and couldn't complete their appearance. Wish I could recall who was the person in this incident, but it just goes to show that doing a controlled video demo of your product is a much better experience overall. You can control all aspects of the presentations, its fluidity and its branding, without killing your reputation. Product demos should always be done as videos, so as not have any hiccups on stage. Best regards, Tony Zeoli President and co-founder *Meet us in Asheville NC o Chapel Hill NC o New York City NY* WordPress | Digital Strategy | IA & UxD | Scrum Agile Dev ? [removed to protect privacy] | Visit Our Site Main ? (877) 237-8318 | Mobile ? [removed to protect privacy] We organize the WordPress Chapel Hill Meetup Social: [image: Facebook] [image: Twitter] [image: LinkedIn] [image: Meetup] More words: Choosing the right Contract Management Tool
Rob Gropper
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Rob Gropper Entrepreneur
Director at PetHero, SPC - Member at Eastside Incubator - Principal at Tuxedo Technologies Group
Kate, can you give us some background on:
1. the nature of the product/service
2. the intended audience
3. the format / context? (i.e. is this for consumption by JQ public via web or for a live audience, intro to a live presentation or part of a live presentation or ???)
Kate Hiscox
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Kate Hiscox Entrepreneur • Advisor
Boss at Venzee
We're building out an saas offering. B2B. Intended audience consists of suppliers and manufacturers (English speaking). This will be used on our website, social media etc. as an introduction to our product, its features and benefits. ?
Duane Nickull
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Duane Nickull Entrepreneur • Advisor
Chief Marketing Officer, Co-Founder at Cheddar Labs
2 minutes max. Problem || Existing condition, extrapolation of the problem (if necessary), your solution and how it solves the problem/need.

Duane

Timothy Clark
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Timothy Clark Entrepreneur
Owner - Radiant Heart Studios
Limiting an explanation video to 2 minutes often requires leaving out a lot of useful information. Making it longer runs the risk of taxing the short attention spans of many people in our fast-paced world. I made a couple of videos to explain a computer app I'm developing. The 19 minute video explained the needs that the app fulfilled, segment populations, viral growth potentials, revenue streams and all the functions (in detailed wire-frames). It was rather boring and it was difficult getting anyone to sit through it. The few people who bothered to watch the whole video carefully we're blown away by the well developed concepts. The 2 minute video was so simplified that most viewers simply didn't "get it." I'm now working on a video that I will try to keep under 10 minutes (still too long) and entertaining enough to hold the viewers' attention.
Paul Bostwick
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Paul Bostwick Entrepreneur
Researcher and Self-Employed Product Designer
Timothy I have two suggestions. (three actually) 1) for the shorter ones the goal is to spark enough interest to warrant the longer deeper look. 2) For the longer deep dives consider chunking it and making it easy to skip to the part each particular audience member cares about. That way they don't have to wade though the stuff they think is obvious or non controversial and can dig into their objections and your approach. 3) An outside - dispassionate eye is sooooo very useful in this context. (maybe you cannot afford to pay one but they can be borrowed) -Paul
Taylor Dondich
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Taylor Dondich Entrepreneur
Vice President of Engineering at MaxCDN
Do the video presentation. Perform it like a pitch. I've done quite a few visual pitches and there was one event that required you to do your video presentation in 5 minutes or less. I've presented it here for reference:

Rob Gropper
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Rob Gropper Entrepreneur
Director at PetHero, SPC - Member at Eastside Incubator - Principal at Tuxedo Technologies Group
i personally get pretty tired of the screenshots with voice-over "here's our product" videos. Once you have my attention and i want to know more about your product then a short tutorial works for me. I've not tried it personally, but if you are trying to build a personal connection between company and the audience (vendor/business partner) then perhaps the CEO doing a very short "you matter to us and here's why" 20-30 second intro to an animated video might work well. no personal experience there though.

1. for basic "here's what we do and why it matters to you" kind of video, it's whatever can catch and hold their attention. My current project is targeted at pet owners and school-age children, a pretty wide spectrum which is challenging, so we went with an animated video (white-board animation) for our landing page (temp). http://www.pethero.org/ It allows us to cover a lot of ground in 120 seconds. If we are doing a presentation (typically 1 or 2 (presenters) on 4-20 (audience) we often start with the video to get everyone on the same page. This type of animation seems to hold people's attention. Kids love it - they almost always ask how the person can draw so fast! :-) Not sure if there is any magic or scientific research to back up the 120 second limit, but that was the line we drew in the sand and it seems to work pretty well. your mileage may vary.
Andrew Angus
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Andrew Angus Entrepreneur
B2B DemandGen Expert, Video Marketing Thought Leader, Co-founder and CEO at Switch Merge
A few things that we have learned at Switch Video. (We have produced over 600 videos at this point.)

- A talking head video only stimulates the auditory sense. Retention is only 10% when you stimulate only the auditory sense.

- Animation can stimulate both the auditory and the visual sense. Retention improves by 58% when you stimulate both the auditory and visual senses.

- Don't focus on your feature set. Focus on the problem you are solving. Your features will change but the problem you are solving won't change. Make your video last longer by staying away from the details and stay focused on the value you offer.

- Keep your video shorter then 90 seconds. You want people to be watching the end of the video and you need to keep it short. The goal should be 60 seconds or less.

More on the Brain Science behind great videos.
http://landing.switchvideo.com/60-seconds-ebook-download

Guide filled with info on how to produce a great video including great script writing tips.
http://landing.switchvideo.com/the-definitive-guide

Kate - If you want to chat further please drop me a line. Email and phone number is at the link below.
http://www.switchvideo.com/company/team/andrew-angus/
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