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Creating first set of drip emails for user onboarding. Common mistakes to avoid? Any rules of thumb?

I'm working on a commerce platform for mostly small, stay-at-home side business owners. The onboarding takes a few weeks where the users need to get up to speed on maintaining and posting to a Facebook business page as well as install the software.

We have the process broken out pretty well from doing it over the phone for a few months and the platform is set (Salesforce + Pardot). We're creating a couple of weekly drip emails based on the steps we usually suggest over the phone. Users still have access to us for any questions.

I'm interested in what has blindsided other people when launching campaigns like this?
Anything to look out for that we may have missed?
Anything you wished afterwards that you had done differently?

2 Replies

Doc Kane
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Doc Kane Advisor
Alliance Manager/Marketing Communications Manager at RevenueWell / Ghostwriter
Hi Morten,

... usually where I see things like this go goofy is in translating verbal instructions to email. Usually someone very familiar with the process outlines it on paper, and than its truncated for email purposes, which presents three possible problems.

The first is the writer is too intimate with the product and thus can't see the material any longer through fresh "new user" eyes. The second is the person writing isn't a writer at all, and a lot is lost in translation. The third is, when truncating things for email, things deemed not important enough, are cut, and usually those are the things that turn out to be pretty important. ;-)

My suggestions would be to have someone who knows nothing about the product read the instructions to see if they can run through your process without additional help. This could be an editor, or even a family member. Basically someone who is as green-as-green-can-be with your software. The last thing you want is to spend the time to automate your on-boarding only to find things aren't clear, and people call you anyway.

Good luck! Doc
Morten Lundsby Jensen
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Founder at UserChamp; Chief Experimentation Officer at Playpen Labs
Thanks Doc, that is very helpful.
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